Fantastic Blackness: The Art and Politics of the Super Hero

Fantastic Blackness: The Art and Politics of the Super Hero

Saturday Feb 25th, 2012 – Saturday Mar 10th, 2012

California State University Northridge

Fantastic Blackness is a bold and engaging exhibit of an insurgent and growing movement of independent black comic book writers and artists.

On display are images that remake, recreate, remap and in many instances revolutionize how the black body (male and female) is seen, consumed, contextualized, enjoyed, feared, desired and thought about. Presented for your enjoyment and contemplation are depictions of enchantingly uncanny and beautifully strange black folk traversing odd worlds and familiar spaces as they sing the body electric in Afrofuturistic depictions that re-imagine the black experience in American society.

Curator: Adilifu Nama, Associate Professor and Chair of African American Studies, Loyola Marymount University

Executive Artist Liason: John Jennings, artist, designer and Associate Professor in Visual Studies at University of Buffalo (SUNY)

Share this!

Subscribe to our RSS feed. Tweet this! StumbleUpon Reddit Digg This! Bookmark on Delicious Share on Facebook
  1. March 14, 2012 at 7:15 pm

    Though I missed the Fantastic Blackness exhibit at CSUN, by just days!, it is still great that it was held. So happens on the last day of the show I was meeting with a brother who is documenting Black cartoonists and moving towards completing a documentary. I hope he did not miss it as I did.

    Being a Black man in the USA can be insular at times, and I wonder what others in the UK, Caribbean or Africa are doing with cartooning and comics.By insular for example Black peoples in any number of lands can hear American Soul, Funk, R&B, Jazz but, with few exceptions, there is not programming besides a token Bob Marley, for High Life, Ska, Calypso, Rock Steady or even Reggae and esthetically our television is careful not to offend us with patois while Englishmen, AU, and other Caucasians are much more freely shown and allowed to keep their native accents and still be good guys.

  2. DC Comics VS. Marvel Comics – “Black Panther” & “Luke Cage” | The Museum Of UnCut Funk

Leave a Reply