Tag Archives: Cotton Comes to Harlem

Uncut Funk By Josiah Howard

JH BOOK

“Bad, Black and Bountiful: The Museum Of UnCut Funk Looks Back at the Blaxploitation Film Genre”. At one time the images were omnipresent: on TV, in movies, on billboards and in magazines. Young African-American men and women in anti establishment starring film roles, wearing bell-bottoms, platforms and Afro hairstyles, and determined to get even—or “get over.” The time was the early 1970s, and the film genre was Blaxploitation—action oriented pictures that, for the most part, told stories culled from America’s crime-ridden inner-cities.

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Gravedigger Jones and Coffin Ed Johnson

Gravedigger Jones and Coffin Ed Johnson1

The Museum of UnCut Funk is actively looking to acquire the 1st edition copies of the Gravedigger Jones and Coffin Ed Johnson Harlem Detectives series of books from famed author Chester Himes for our archives. We love a good read but the art on the cover of these books that were printed during the 50s and 60s is a lost art form and needs to be persevered.

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40th Anniversary of Blaxploitation Vol. 1 – 1970

1970 Banner

Celebrating the 40th anniversaries of Blaxploitation films and films that starred Black actors during the Blaxploitation film genre. These films were released from January 1 – December 31, 1970 during the “Greatest Decade Ever” in Black cinematic history. Most of these movie posters are in the collection of The Museum Of UnCut Funk, except Ghetto Freaks and The McMasters.

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Looking back at ‘Blaxploitation’ films by Stephen Whitty

Looking back at ‘Blaxploitation’ films by Stephen Whitty

Stephen Whitty is a writer for The Star Ledger, the largest newspaper in New Jersey. Stephen has agreed to allow the Museum Of UnCut Funk to reprint a excerpt from his article.

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Blaxploitation And The Man

 

Stickin’ It To The Man.


In the early 1900’s the term “The Man” was used to describe a boss figure. This term later began to be applied to anyone who hassled a group of people and eventually to anyone in a position of power.

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Battle Of The Beauties

The Women of Blaxploitation


The Black Movie Boom of the 1970’s created jobs for young Black actresses and introduced new talents such as Pam Grier, Vonetta McGee, Gloria Henry, Tamara Dobson, Judy Pace, Esther Anderson, Paula Kelly, Carol Speed, Lisa Moore, Rosalind Cash, Jaki Demar, Rosalind Miles, Kathy Imrie, Shelia Frazier and Brenda Skyes.

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That’s Some Funny Shit! Exhibition – Part 2

 

You’re A Funny Ass Mofo!

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Where Are They Now!!!

Where Are They Now!!!

The 1970s produced the film genre that would become known as ‘Blaxploitation’. These films were made specifically with an urban Black audience in mind. These movies were larger-than-life, action-packed and full of funk and soul music. These films also incorporated progressive social and political commentary. From Pam Grier to Bill Cosby, check out who delved into this genre and what the actors have been doing since the 1970s.

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Judy Pace

Judy Pace

Some would argue that if there was one actress that threatened Pam Grier’s reign as America’s Black glamour queen of the 70’s, it was the bewitching bronze beauty Judy Pace. A former Ebony Magazine model, Judy was a modern day Queen Neferteri, with sexy bedroom eyes, pouting full lips, all gloriously displayed on a petite chestnut brown frame. In color-conscious Hollywood, Judy became one of the first dark-skinned dramatic actresses to be recognized as a sex-symbol. The Daily Variety once referred to her as The most beautiful woman in Hollywood.

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Crazy, Sexy, Kool Calvin Lockhart

Crazy, Sexy, Kool Calvin Lockhart

Many Black actors have been faced with difficult choices and obstacles. The Bahamas-born Calvin Lockhart, who has died in 2007 was no exception. The handsome, charismatic Lockhart, who had classical acting training and who spoke French, German, Italian and Spanish, was mainly forced to take roles that he disliked.

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