Welcome To The Museum Of UnCut Funk!
International. Intergalactic.


The planet’s first virtual museum dedicated to the celebration and preservation of the FUNK!

The foremost authority and archive of 1970’s Black culture and all things FUNKY!

A living, breathing, FUNKEMPORIUM!

 

Celebrating Beautiful Black Women!!!

Introducing Our Afrotopia Brand
Introducing Our Afrotopia Brand

Afrotopia, our funky retro brand, features Vintage Black images from the 1950’s.
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Sexy, Foxy and Soulful
Sexy, Foxy and Soulful

Calling all Soul Sisters…
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Sculptor Tina Allen
Sculptor Tina Allen

Tina Allen is no longer with us but her sculptures can be seen around the world.
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Bessie Coleman by Jane Sutcliffe
Bessie Coleman by Jane Sutcliffe

The Museum Of UnCut Funk discovered this article by Jane Stucliffe. We have emailed Ms. Stucliffe for an interview but have not heard from her as of yet. We hope you enjoy her essay.
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Clarice Taylor
Clarice Taylor

Clarice Taylor, the actress and comedian best known for playing grandmothers on “The Cosby Show” and “Sesame Street,” has died at the age of 93. Taylor died of congestive heart failure in her home in Englewood, N.J., on Monday, said her son, William Taylor. During a career that spanned five decades, Taylor performed on radio and TV, in film and on stage, including in the original Broadway cast of the musical “The Wiz.”
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Sistas Who Rocked The Met Vol. 2
Sistas Who Rocked The Met Vol. 2

Leontyne Price, a lyric soprano, is one of the world´s leading lyric sopranos. Her career in concerts and opera has brought her the praise of public and critics alike.
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Janet MacLachlan
Janet MacLachlan

Janet MacLachlan, who played the compassionate schoolteacher in Martin Ritt’s Oscar-nominated “Sounder” (1972), has died at age 77. A highly respected stage, film and television actress, Maclachlan was known for a serious, no-nonsense style that led her to be often cast as a judge, nurse, doctor, psychiatrist, teacher or social worker. She was highly visible during the transitional period of the 1960s and 70s, when African-Americans fought against negative stereotypes on screen and began to make significant inroads in front of and behind the cameras.
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Sistas Who Rocked The Met Vol. 1
Sistas Who Rocked The Met Vol. 1

An internationally acclaimed opera and concert singer, Mattiwilda Dobbs has a voice often compared to the clear and resonant sound of a bell and she is known for warm, intimate performances. Only two Blacks sang at the Metropolitan Opera before her, and, appearing in Rigoletto in 1956, she was the first Black to perform a romantic lead on that stage.
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Opera Is Funky Too!
Opera Is Funky Too!

Sissieretta Jones aka Black Patti (1869-1933) was a pioneer of Black operatic singing, and she paved the way for a long list of black opera singers to follow, including Marian Anderson, Roland Hayes, Leontyne Price, and Grace Bumbry, among others.
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Eartha Kitt
Eartha Kitt

Eartha Kitt established herself in film, theater, cabaret, music and on television. By the time she was 20, Eartha was a featured dancer and vocalist in the Katherine Dunham Dance Company Troupe and was touring Europe where she was seen by Orson Wells who was quoted as calling her “the most exciting woman in the world”.
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Rosalind Cash
Rosalind Cash

Rosalind Cash was born in Atlantic City, New Jersey, on December 31, 1938. As a young woman, she took off with only $20 in her pocket to seek her fame and fortune in New York City. At first things were difficult: “I had a cold-water one-room apartment in Harlem sharing a kitchen I didn’t dare use because of the rats,” she told The Guardian. But Cash attended the City College of New York, and managed to ferret out the first stirrings of independent black theater in the city. She made her stage debut in 1958 in a production at the Harlem YMCA, performing in a play by Langston Hughes called Soul Gone Home.
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Juanita Moore
Juanita Moore

Juanita Moore started her acting career in the early ’50s, a time during which very few Black actresses were given roles of substance in major-studio films.
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Ms. Lena
Ms. Lena

Lena Horne, whose striking beauty and magnetic sex appeal often overshadowed her talent and artistry, was remarkably candid about the underlying reason for her success: “I was unique in that I was a kind of Black that white people could accept,” she once said.
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Marpessa Dawn
Marpessa Dawn

Marpessa Dawn was directed by Marcel Camus and based on the Greek myth of Orpheus and Eurydice, “Orfeu Negro,” as it is called in Portuguese, brings together an innocent country girl, played by Ms. Dawn, and a trolley car motorman and gifted guitarist, portrayed by Mr. Mello. They meet amid the frenzy of Rio’s carnival and are soon swaying to a provocative samba among the crowds. But Eurydice is stalked by a man in a skeleton costume. Eventually, Orpheus finds her in the morgue. In the end, bearing her body in his arms, he falls to his death from a cliff.
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Dorothy Height – They Don’t Make Them Like This Anymore
Dorothy Height – They Don’t Make Them Like This Anymore

Dorothy Height marched alongside Martin Luther King and led the National Council of Negro Women for 40 years, was known for her determination and grace as well as her wry humor. She remained active and outspoken well into her 90s and often received rousing ovations at events around Washington, where she was easily recognizable in the bright, colorful hats she almost always wore.
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Vonetta McGee
Vonetta McGee

Without question, one of the most breathtaking beauties to emerge out of the 70’s “Blaxploitation” era was actress Vonetta McGee. This lovely sister, born in San Francisco on January 14, 1945, possessed the complete package; looks, talent and determination which should have made her a marquee name in Hollywood. Instead, this tantalizing, tan, and talented lady found herself in in the land of Blaxploitation, where her some would considerable her talents were laid to waste.
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Judy Pace
Judy Pace

Some would argue that if there was one actress that threatened Pam Grier’s reign as America’s Black glamour queen of the 70’s, it was the bewitching bronze beauty Judy Pace. A former Ebony Magazine model, Judy was a modern day Queen Neferteri, with sexy bedroom eyes, pouting full lips, all gloriously displayed on a petite chestnut brown frame. In color-conscious Hollywood, Judy became one of the first dark-skinned dramatic actresses to be recognized as a sex-symbol. The Daily Variety once referred to her as The most beautiful woman in Hollywood.
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Ms. Pam Grier
Ms. Pam Grier

“She’s the Godmother of them all…The Baddest One-Chick Hit Squad that ever hit town!” So promised the 1973 promotional poster for the American International Pictures release of Coffy; whose star was a luscious afro-sporting, gun toting, buxom Nubian princess named Pam Grier.
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Roxie Roker
Roxie Roker

Roxie Roker may best be remembered for playing outspoken Helen Willis for ten years on the popular television sitcom The Jeffersons.
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Sheila Frazier
Sheila Frazier

Actress and producer Sheila Elaine Frazier was born on November 13, 1948 in the Bronx, New York to Dorothy Dennis and Eugene Cole Frazier. Frazier grew up on the Lower East Side of New York City until the age of ten, when she moved with her mother to Englewood, New Jersey.
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Naomi Sims
Naomi Sims

Naomi Sims: Entrepreneur; Writer; Fashion Model

Naomi Sims, one of the top Black businesswomen in the United States, began her career as the first Black supermodel.
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Shirley Chisholm – Catalyst For Change
Shirley Chisholm – Catalyst For Change

Ain’t No Mountain High Enough
She Was Ahead Of Her Time

This tireless fighter for the poor made history in Congress and at the Democratic National Convention. Shirley Anita St. Hill was born in Brooklyn on Nov. 30, 1924.
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Nichelle Nichols
Nichelle Nichols

Below is a short called “Trek Turner”, a remix of the cartoon version featuring Lieutenant Uhura from the Star Trek animated series, dubbed over with Nichelle Nichols’ dialogue from the 1974 blaxploitation film “Truck Turner”. Animated or live action, that’s one Bad Ass Bitch!
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  • Blaxploitation

    Funky Turns 40 Logo

    The Museum Of UnCut Funk celebrates the 1970's Blaxploitation
    era. Blaxploitation film, soundtracks, style and attitude.
    It's a love thang!

  • Legends

    Funky Turns 40 Logo

    Funk. P-Funk. UnCut Funk. The Bomb. Nothing but the Funk! Funkin' In Your Earhole. Our Interviews With The Legends Of FUNK!

  • Aesthetic Grooves Blog

    Sista ToFunky

    A place for comics, graphic novels, graphic design...if it is funky and aesthetically groovy I will cover it here.

  • Cafe 70 Blog

    Sista-ToFunky-and-Dorian

    Cafe 70 features my favorite recipes that put an unconventional spin on Soul Food and FUNK IT UP, my favorites things to eat from my favorite restaurants, food shops and gourmet spots that offer the ultimate gastronomical experience. Welcome to my culinary ride!

  • Funky Stuff Blog

    Sista ToFunky

    Because I just can’t get enough...This blog will be about my favorite funky items and facts from the 1970’s and beyond.

  • Kool Cats Hip Chicks Blog

    Blaxploitation

    This blog is dedicated to my heroes and sheroes, all the brothas and sistas who made the 1970’s soooo funky, but whose accomplishments and contributions never got the respect they really deserved.

  • Funkalicious Blog

    c-dub

    All FUNK, mostly music, but all that is FUNKY, the culture of FUNK, UnCut Funk, The Bomb! If it's FUNKY, it's All Good.

  • Funky President Blog

    Barack Obama

    The Museum Of UnCut Funk chronicles the First Black President of the United States, Barack Obama.