Tag Archives: NAACP

The FUNKY Blatant Black Ignorance of Rachel Dolezal & Interviews

The FUNKY Blatant Black Ignorance of Rachel Dolezal & Interviews

This is a follow-up to my initial thoughts on the actions of Rachel Dolezal.  In lieu of her Fakin’ the FUNK, I simply want to display her false reality, accompanied by reactions to her delusion.

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NAACP Prez Rachel Dolezal Believes She’s a Black Woman

NAACP Prez Rachel Dolezal Believes She’s a Black Woman

After years of oppression and discrimination that black people have endured, a white woman has benefited from these atrocities.  Born and raised as a white person, Rachel Dolezal who’s the President of the NAACP chapter in Spokane, Washington, appears to genuinely believe she’s actually a black woman.

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MARTIN LUTHER KING’S 50TH ANNIVERSARY OF A DREAM!

MARTIN LUTHER KING’S 50TH ANNIVERSARY OF A DREAM!

Thousands marched on Washington this past weekend to commemorate the 50th anniversary of Dr. Martin Luther King’s “I Have A Dream” speech.  The actual date that the speech was rendered, is today.  My niece Leighana was among the multitude, where Reverend Al Sharpton, the NAACP’s Ben Jealous, and King’s eldest son, Martin Luther King III, spoke.  Here’s a shot of my niece below, who continued a tradition her mother and I participated in when Stevie Wonder campaigned for King’s birthday, to be declared a national holiday.  Apart from a few words from King III, I’ll let the esteemed Dr. King do the rest.

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Racism in Animation

Racism in Animation

Whether Americans like it or not, cartoons of the 30s and 40s, considered the Golden Age of Animation, were extremely racist. Cartoons made by Warner Brothers, Metro Goldwyn Mayor, Walter Lantz, and other animation studios, depicted ridiculous stereotypes of Blacks with disquieting regularity.

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Brown v Board Of Education Commemorative Bronze Medal

Brown v Board Of Education Commemorative Bronze Medal

The 1954 Supreme Court case known as Brown versus Board of Education of Topeka (Kansas) actually included five cases from five different states, but all the cases related to the issue of ending racial segregation in public schools. The Commemorative Bronze Medal commemorating this seminal case is in the collection of the Museum Of UnCut Funk.

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The Street Where You Live

The Street Where You Live

The Street Where You Live … And What You Can Do To Improve It! is another NAACP comic book that was published in the 1960’s. The focus of this comic book was to stress the importance of registering to vote and participating in the voting process as a means of brining about positive change in one’s neighborhood. The NAACP also published another comic book entitled Your Future Rests In Your Hands which also stressed the importance of voting.

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NAACP Comic Book History circa 1964

NAACP Comic Book History circa 1964

Early NAACP Comic Book History – Your Future Rests In Your Hands. This NAACP comic book stresses the importance of voting and other forms of civil engagement like education and employment. Check it out below.

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NAACP Image Awards circa 1975

NAACP Image Awards circa 1975

As we prepare for the 43rd annual NAACP Images Awards, the Museum of UnCut Funk decided to take a trip down memory lane.

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Blaxploitation Filmography

 

The Civil Rights and Black Power Movements of the 1960’s set the stage for the 1970’s Black film revolution.

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Rosalind Cash

Rosalind Cash

Rosalind Cash was born in Atlantic City, New Jersey, on December 31, 1938. As a young woman, she took off with only $20 in her pocket to seek her fame and fortune in New York City. At first things were difficult: “I had a cold-water one-room apartment in Harlem sharing a kitchen I didn’t dare use because of the rats,” she told The Guardian. But Cash attended the City College of New York, and managed to ferret out the first stirrings of independent black theater in the city. She made her stage debut in 1958 in a production at the Harlem YMCA, performing in a play by Langston Hughes called Soul Gone Home.

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Ms. Lena

Ms. Lena

Lena Horne, whose striking beauty and magnetic sex appeal often overshadowed her talent and artistry, was remarkably candid about the underlying reason for her success: “I was unique in that I was a kind of Black that white people could accept,” she once said.

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Benjamin Hooks – A Real Maverick

Benjamin Hooks – A Real Maverick

Mr. Hooks told Ebony magazine soon after he became the association’s executive director in 1977. “The civil rights movement is not dead. “If anyone thinks that we are going to stop agitating, they had better think again. If anyone thinks that we are going to stop litigating, they had better close the courts. If anyone thinks that we are not going to demonstrate and protest, they had better roll up the sidewalks.”

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Percy Sutton

Percy Sutton

 
America has truly lost an icon of cultural signifigance. As a 20+ year veteran in the business of entertainment, my foundation would not exist, had it not been for him. Percy Sutton, the founder of Inner City Broadcasting – the home of New York’s first and only black-owned radio station, has passed.

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